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Greenhills Earns Computer Science Female Diversity Award for Third Consecutive Year

Greenhills School has received the AP Computer Science Female Diversity Award — for the third consecutive year — for its high female representation in AP Computer Science Principles courses. Of the 20,000 institutions that offer AP courses, only 1,119 received this award for achieving 50% or higher female exam taker representation in one of or both AP computer science courses, or a percentage of female computer science exam takers that meets or exceeds that of the school’s female population.

“Greenhills is a school where it’s not just okay to be smart, it’s celebrated, and this is an example of that,” said Greenhills Head of School Peter B. Fayroian. “Equity and inclusivity are important to us, and we have been intentional in cultivating an environment that encourages female students to engage in math and computer science — something that benefits all students. It’s no accident this is a three-peat.”

The computer science program has flourished at Greenhills, in large part, because of the passion and leadership of teacher and coach Lisa Flohr. Since joining Greenhills in 2014, she has developed an engaging curriculum, chaired student coding clubs, and motivated countless students to pursue a career in computer science.

Providing female students with access to computer science courses is critical to ensuring gender parity in the industry’s high-paying jobs and to drive innovation, creativity, and representation. However, a code.org analysis of 2017 Bureau of Labor Statistics data finds women represent just 24% of the five million people in computing occupations. And in American high schools, female students remain under-represented in computer science classes, comprising just 34% of AP Computer Science Principles participants. 

“Greenhills School’s students need the power to shape technology, not just cope with it,” says Stefanie Sanford, College Board chief of global policy and external relations. “Young women deserve an equal opportunity to become the next generation of entrepreneurs, engineers and tech leaders. Closing the gap in computer science education empowers young women to build the future they want.”

According to a 2020 College Board study, female students who take AP Computer Science Principles (CSP) in high school are more than five times as likely to major in computer science in college, compared to similar female students who did not take CSP. The study also finds AP CSP students are nearly twice as likely to enroll in AP CSA, and that for most students, AP CSP serves as a stepping-stone to other advanced AP STEM coursework.

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